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The Perfect Redwood National Park Itinerary | How to Spend 2 Days Adventuring

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Bright green ferns in front of redwood trees

EXPLORE OUR COMPREHENSIVE REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK 2 DAY AND 3 DAY ITINERARIES, AND LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BEST THINGS TO DO IN THE NATIONAL PARK BELOW.

 



Are you planning on visiting Redwood National Park but don't know where to even begin with your trip planning? Don't worry, we feel you. When we decided to spend some time in this part of Northern California we got a bit overwhelmed. For starters, the national park - which is actually made up of one national park and three state parks - is quite huge. It is also very spread out. Plus, there is just a whole lot to see.


But don't worry, we are here to help.


Below are some super fun Redwood National Park travel itineraries for every type of traveler and every type of time frame; including two travel itineraries for if you have one full day in the park, 2 days in the park, or (if you are really lucky) three days in the park. These travel itineraries lay out some of the best ways to spend your time in the area, while also giving you a couple of extra tips on things like where to spend the night and what to bring with you to the park.


► If you have any other questions about exploring the national park, then make sure to check out our super comprehensive Redwood National Park Adventure Guide.






REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK MAP








 

REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK TRAVEL ITINERARY

 






Redwood National and State Parks Half Day Itinerary


We suggest that if you are short on time (for example you only have a couple of hours) then you should try to focus on just one area of the park instead of the whole entire park (it is just too big). Below are two separate half-day itineraries for the northern half and southern half of the park.



NORTH

If you only have half a day to explore Redwood National Park and you are looking to get up close and personal with the famous coastal redwood trees, then we suggest sticking to the northern half of the park, and specifically Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park in particular.



THE PERFECT HALF-DAY ITINERARY


| Start at the Hiouchi Visitor Center where you can spend some time exploring the exhibits, learn more about the history of the area and eat breakfast or lunch at one of the center's picnic tables.


| Next, drive the famous Howland Hill Road, which was once an old stagecoach route (don't worry it is still as narrow today). Along the drive, which is 10 miles in length, you should make sure to stop off and explore some of the large redwood groves, including Stout Grove, and also check out the super clear Smith River, which is one of the last undammed rivers in California.


| Finally, once you get to the end of Howland Hill Road, which spits you out near the town of Crescent City, you should hop on over to Crescent Beach and the Crescent Beach Overlook. Both will give you great views of the stunning Northern California coastline and the Pacific Ocean.


From the beach, you can easily hop back on Highway 101 and head either south towards San Francisco or north towards Oregon.




SOUTH

Or if you only have half a day and are looking to spend more time along the Pacific coast, while also visiting a few redwood groves, then we suggest spending your time down in the southern half of the park, and more specifically, Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park.



THE PERFECT HALF-DAY ITINERARY


| Start at the Prairie Creek Visitor Center where you can check out the exhibits, talk to a ranger about the area and grab your national park passport stamp (if you are into that).


| Once you get your fill of the visitor center, start driving the stunningly beautiful Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway. The drive, which is 11 miles long, gives you easy access to a number of interesting sites - including the Atlas Grove, the Big Tree Wayside and a number of short hiking trails.


Towards the end of your drive, you can either turn off and do the Coastal Drive, which loops around a forest and gives you great views of the coast, or you can head back the way you came (back towards the visitor center) and drive out to Gold Bluffs Beach, one of the best beaches in the whole national park.


💬 INSIDER TIP: if you are planning to visit during the busy season (May to September) then you will need a permit to park at the Gold Bluffs Beach parking area. If you can't get a permit but still want to head to the beach, then we suggest driving a bit further south and checking out the Redwood Creek Picnic Area instead.


From the beaches, you can easily hop back on Highway 101 and head either south towards San Francisco or up north towards Oregon.




EXPLORE MORE | THE ULTIMATE REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK ADVENTURE GUIDE






Redwood National and State Parks 1 Day Itinerary


Even if you have a bit more time to spend in Redwood National and State Park, we still suggest focusing on one area of the park instead of the whole complex. Because the distance between places is quite large, in our opinion, it is still better to put more of your time and energy into exploring via foot (like hiking) than it is to just drive around. Below are two full day itineraries for Redwood National Park.



NORTH

| Start at the Hiouchi Visitor Center where you can explore the various exhibits, learn more about the history of the area and eat breakfast or lunch at one of the center's picnic tables. OR you can grab a quick bite to eat and some caffeine at the nearby Historic Hiouchi Café, a super cute spot that opens at 7 AM daily.


| Next, drive out on the famously scenic Howland Hill Road. Along the drive, which is 10 miles in length, you should stop off and explore some of the large redwood groves - including the beautiful Stout Grove. Likewise, since you have a full day, why not also head out on the beautiful Boy Scout Tree Trail, which is 5.5 miles round trip and gives you awesome access to Fern Falls and some massive trees.


Another great adventure option in the northern part of Redwood National Park, is to spend a bit of time hanging out along the banks of the Smith River, which runs right along the northern edge of the park. You can access the river via the Stout Grove Trail or by parking at the Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park Day-Use Area, though this costs $8 unless you have a national park or state park pass. From the day-use area, you will need to cross a seasonal footbridge.


If you are looking to spend the night in the area at the end of your one day of exploring, you have the option to camp in either Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park or book a hotel room in the nearby town of Crescent City (see our recommended hotels below).


From Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park you can easily drive back towards Highway 101 near Crescent City, where you can then head either south towards San Francisco or north along the Oregon coast.




SOUTH


Start your full day of adventures in the southern half of the national park at Gold Bluffs Beach (just make sure to get your parking permit). From the beach, you can walk around and do a small section of the California Coastal Trail or you can head straight to the trailhead for the famous Fern Canyon hike.


Fern Canyon is one of the most popular hikes in the whole Redwood National Park, so be prepared for it to be busy (especially during the summer). The hike, though short (less than 2 miles) is stunning and definitely worth doing.


Once you finish the hike and get your fill of the beach, drive back to the Prairie Creek Visitor Center and then onto the Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway. Along this scenic drive, you have the opportunity to stop off at such destinations as Big Tree Wayside and the Atlas Grove. You can also do another short hike in one of the redwood groves along the way if you have the energy.


If you are looking to spend the night in this part of the national park, you have the option to camp in either the Elk Prairie Campground or Gold Bluffs Beach Campground, or book a hotel room in the nearby town of Klamath (see our recommended hotels below).




Picnic tables under a sunny forest of coastal redwoods



Redwood National and State Parks 2 Day Itinerary


If you are planning to spend two full days in the national park (good choice), then you have a lot of options on how to fill your time. Below are two basic 2-day itineraries.


The first one is to follow what we outlined above for the one full day itinerary and just do either the Northern Half on day 1 and the Southern Half on day 2, or vice-versa (depending on where you are coming from). If this is the route you want to take - which is kind of what we did while visiting Redwood National Park - then we suggest reserving a night at the Mill Creek Campground, which is located in the middle of the national park, or booking a room in Klamath.


OR


If you want to do something a bit different, why not spend your first day in Redwood National Park doing a big hike and then the second day exploring more via car.


A great hike to do on day 1 is the James Irvine Trail to Fern Canyon. This hike is 11 miles total and starts at the Prairie Creek Visitor Center. The James Irvine Trail takes you through massive redwood groves before spitting you out near the coast at the Fern Canyon Trailhead. This is a great option if you want to see both redwoods and the rugged California coast or if you want to hike Fern Canyon but didn't get a permit.


Once you finish the hike, drive up to Mill Creek Campground in Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park where you can camp for the night (make sure to get a reservation ahead of time).


On your second day, drive out to Crescent Beach and Crescent Beach Overlook, or spend an hour or two exploring Endert's Beach, which is a popular place for tidepooling. Once done at the beach, drive a bit further north until you reach the beginning of Howland Hill Road. This scenic drive gives you easy access to some great coastal redwood groves, including Stout Grove and the Grove of Titans. Finish your second day by relaxing along the Smith River or grabbing a quick bite to eat in the town of Hiouchi.




EXPLORE MORE | VISITING AVENUE OF THE GIANTS IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW






Redwood National and State Parks 3 Day Itinerary


If you have a full three days in Redwood National and State Parks then definitely consider spending at least part of it in the park's beautiful backcountry. The national park has seven backcountry sites available - ranging from open prairies surrounded by pine trees to hidden sites along the coast. Some of the most popular areas to go backpacking are Flint Ridge, which is located off of the California Coastal Trail, Elam Camp, which is located near Redwood Creek Trail, and Redwood Creek Gravel Bar, which is the only area in the park where dispersed camping is permitted.


If you choose to backpack in the more southern part of the national park - for example at the Elam Camp or Redwood Creek Gravel Bar - then on the third day of your time in the area we suggest spending it relaxing either at the coast (at Gold Bluffs Beach for example) or in one of the numerous redwood groves. In the southern half, one great grove to explore is Lady Bird Johnson Grove, which is located right off of the scenic Bald Hills Road.


You can learn more about backpacking in Redwood National Park - including how to get a FREE backpacking permit ahead of time - here.







 

OTHER THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT VISITING REDWOOD NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS

 






\\ Where to Stay in Redwood National and State Parks


Because Redwood National and State Parks is within a short drive of a number of small Northern California towns, you can find a fair amount of lodging options available depending on your budget. From cozy hotels to stunning campgrounds nestled into the redwoods themselves to RV parks within a short walk of the beach, this area has a lot to offer. Below are some of the best places to stay near Redwood National Park.



LODGING NEAR REDWOOD NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS


There are no lodges within the national or state parks. The closest towns with optimal lodging are going to be Klamath, which is located in the middle of the national park between Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park and Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park; Crescent City, which is roughly 10 minutes away from Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park; and Eureka, which is around 45 minutes south of the southern entrance to the national park.



Below are a few of the best options when it comes to booking lodging near Redwood National and State Parks.


| Anchor Beach Inn: this modern hotel in Crescent City sits right across the street from South Beach and just up the road from Crescent Harbor. The hotel offers free parking, electrical vehicle chargers, high speed internet, and water sport equipment rentals. | BOOK YOUR STAY


| Pacific Inn: another great option in the Crescent City area is this comfortable hotel that is located right in the heart of downtown. Amenities include free parking, free wi-fi, and in-room microwaves and refrigerators. The hotel is also dog friendly. | BOOK YOUR STAY


| Curly Redwood Lodge: with a funky name like that, you have to know there is an interesting story behind it. In this case, the name actually comes from the fact that one curly redwood tree was used to build the hotel (it produced over 55,000 feet of lumber!). Amenities at this Crescent City hotel include free parking, free wi-fi, and a 24-hour front desk. | BOOK YOUR STAY


| Woodland Villa Country Cabins: located in the middle of the small town of Klamath, which in turn is located in the heart of Redwood National and State Parks, this cool resort offers 12 individual cabins as well as a small restaurant, coffee shop and market. Other amenities include free parking and kid friendly activities. The cabins are only half a mile from the Trees of Mystery (an outdoor amusement-style destination) and less than two miles from the Yurok Loop Trail and Wilson Creek Beach. | BOOK YOUR STAY


| Hiouchi Motel: this small locally-owned motel is located in the tiny town of Hiouchi, which is a very short drive from the Jedediah Smith Redwoods National Park and the entrance to the Howland Hill Road. Amenities include free parking, free breakfast and wi-fi. | BOOK YOUR STAY


Basic campground in Redwood National Park

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CAMPING IN REDWOOD NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS


There are four developed campgrounds within the parks. From north to south, they are Jedediah Smith, Mill Creek, Elk Prairie and Gold Bluffs Beach. All four campgrounds can quickly fill up - especially during the busy spring and summer season. Therefore it is highly recommended that you reserve your campsite in advance. You can do that here or head to reservecalifornia.com for more information.



Below is a quick breakdown of each of the four established campgrounds within the national and state parks:


JEDEDIAH SMITH CAMPGROUND

This large campground is located within Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. From the campground, you have easy access to the Stout Grove Trailhead, the Hiouchi Visitor Center, the Hiouchi Trailhead and the Templeman Redwood Grove.


Cost: $35 /night

Number of Sites: 86, no RV hook-ups

Hours: open year-round

Facilities: hot showers, ADA-accessible restrooms, dump station, picnic tables, fire pits, food lockers, and trash bins.


Find the exact location of the Jedediah Smith Campground here.



MILL CREEK CAMPGROUND

Located a bit further south in Del Norte Redwoods State Park, the Mill Creek Campground is quite a bit larger than Jedediah Smith Campground. It is also a bit closer to the town of Crescent City as well as to a couple of beaches (including Crescent Beach).


Cost: $35 /night

Number of Sites: 145, no RV hook-ups

Hours: the campground is open May 18 through September 30

Facilities: hot showers, ADA-accessible restrooms, dump station, picnic tables, fire pits, food lockers, and trash bins.


Find the exact location of the Mill Creek Campground here.



ELK PRAIRIE CAMPGROUND

A bit smaller than the other two campgrounds, the Elk Prairie Campground is located in the more southern part of the park and is likely the best option if you are hoping to head out on hiking and biking trails directly from the campground. Similarly, this is also where you might have the best opportunity to spot Roosevelt elk and other wildlife.


Cost: $35 /night

Number of Sites: 75, no RV hook-ups

Hours: open year-round

Facilities: hot showers, ADA-accessible restrooms, dump station, picnic tables, fire pits, food lockers, and trash bins.


Find the exact location of the Elk Prairie Campground here.



GOLD BLUFFS BEACH CAMPGROUND

The smallest of the four campgrounds, and also maybe the most remote (you have to take an unpaved road to reach it), the Gold Bluffs Beach Campground is the only one not within a large forested environment. Instead, you are right on the Gold Bluffs Beach as well as the beautiful California Coastal Trail.


Cost: $35 /night

Number of Sites: 26, no RV hook-ups

Hours: it is typically open all year (though check beforehand)

Facilities: solar showers, restrooms, wind shelters, picnic tables, fire pits, food lockers, and trash receptacles.


Find the exact location of the Gold Bluffs Beach Campground here.




BACKCOUNTRY CAMPING IN REDWOOD NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS

If you are looking for a bit more adventure or if you just want to get away from people and instead get back to nature, then maybe consider reserving one of the national parks 7 backcountry campsites.


The sites, which can be reached via foot (backpacking), bike, horse or raft, are located in such environments as old-growth redwood forests, oak woodlands, beaches, prairies, and marshes. While there are only 7 designated campsites, many of them have multiple camps. No matter which site you choose to camp in, you will need to first get a backcountry permit - which is now only available online.


You can learn more about each campsite - including how to get there and what to expect - and also reserve your permit here.




Golden light in a dense redwood grove in California


CAMPING OUTSIDE OF REDWOOD NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS


If you are hoping to camp or spend the night outside of the national park - either because the park is full or you need RV hook-ups (the national park campgrounds don't have any) - then we recommend checking out these three spots. All are within a short drive (or walk, or bike ride) of the park's many outdoor adventures, including hiking trails, redwood groves and beaches.



Below are some of the best RV parks and campgrounds near Redwood National Park:


| Camp Klamath RV Park and Campground: located right on the edge of the town of Klamath (which is in the middle of the national park), this cute, family-run RV park and campground includes full hook-up RV sites, a large picnic and BBQ area, and easy access to the coast and beaches. | BOOK YOUR STAY


| Golden Bear RV Resort: just up the road a little ways from Camp Klamath is another fantastic spot to base yourself if you are looking to stay in your RV near the national park. The Gold Bear RV Resort is a bit closer to the mouth of the Klamath River and within a short drive of the Klamath River Overlook and the California Coastal Trail. The resort includes free internet, self-serve laundry and is pet friendly. | BOOK YOUR STAY


| Redwood Meadows RV Resort: this more northern RV resort and campground is located super close to Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park and its numerous trails. Likewise, the resort is right in the heart of the small town of Hiouchi, which has a few restaurants and cafes and a small grocery store. Within a short drive or walk you can reach the Smith River, the Grove of the Titans and Stout Grove. | BOOK YOUR STAY





\\ What to Bring With You to Redwood National and State Parks


The weather in Redwood National Park is often times a bit on the chillier side - though in the summer, during the day, it can sometimes start to heat up just a bit, especially if you are out hiking. Therefore, we recommend focusing on packing layers when planning to visit Redwood National Park. That way you can be cozy during the chillier, foggy mornings and then easily switch to more lightweight and breathable clothing once the sun starts to shine.


Below are a few of the key things you will want to make sure to pack with you when visiting Redwood National Park and the surrounding area.


| Thermal Base Layers: a great way to start your layering process is to invest in a set of nice, comfortable, wicking base layers. This long sleeved shirt works great on its own and also under a rain jacket or light puffy, while these cozy tights are perfect under a light set of hiking pants.


| Rain Jacket: one of the most necessary outdoor items you will want to pack with you when visiting Redwood National Park is a solid rain jacket. This piece of clothing will likely come in super handy if you are planning to do any morning adventures, for that is when rain and fog are most common. This longer rain jacket by Kuhl is breathable and easy to move around in.


| Light Puffy Jacket: while a rain jacket is a great place to start, you will also want to bring along a lighter puffy jacket for those chilly mornings, and those evenings spent around the fire. This puffy by Mountain Hardwear packs down easily, is made of durable recycled materials and has synthetic insulation that delivers lightweight warmth even when wet.


| Waterproof Hiking Boots: while most of the trails within Redwood National Park are quite short, there are still enough adventures to be had that you will definitely want to bring along some solid waterproof hiking shoes. This mostly leather pair by Danner is comfortable, lightweight and has great gripping abilities for when you are hiking on wetter surfaces.


| Wool Socks: because it never gets super, super cold up in Redwood National Park, you can actually get away with wearing a bit lighter pair of hiking socks. This pair by Icebreaker is made out of a Merino wool blend that helps regulate temps and repels unwanted odors. It also has a reinforced heel and toe area to enhance durability for extensive wear (because no one likes wearing socks with holes in them).


| Sunscreen and Bug Spray: while you might expect very little sun out in the redwoods, you will likely be surprised to find that in the summer it can get quite bright out. But honestly, no matter where you are planning to hike, it is important to protect your skin by always wearing sunscreen. This eco-friendly sunscreen by Badger is perfect for storing in your backpack or car.


Also, the mosquitos are no joke up in the redwoods so definitely make sure to bring along at least one bottle of bug spray. This one by Murphy's Naturals is made entirely from all natural ingredients and also repels ticks.


| Hiking Fanny Pack: if you are just looking to do the shorter hikes around Redwood National Park (which mostly take you through massive coastal redwood groves) then you can get away with just a lightweight fanny pack. This durable and easy to carry one by Patagonia is 5L in size - which is definitely plenty of room for your phone, keys, Chapstick and maybe some bug spray.


| Hiking Day Pack: but if you are instead thinking about heading out on a couple of longer hikes while in Redwood National and State Parks then you will want a bit more carrying capacity than 5 liters. This 15 liter backpack by Osprey is lightweight, has comfortable straps and even has a specific spot for your water bladder.



➳ You can find even more awesome outdoor adventure gear at Backcountry.com.





\\ The Top Adventures in Redwood National and State Parks


There are over two hundred miles of trails within Redwood National and State Parks. All of the hikes will be beautiful and amazing - so if you are stressing about doing the "perfect" hike, don't. They are all fantastic. Below are a few worth considering depending on your time requirements and fitness level.


SHORTER TRAILS


| Simpson-Reed Trail // 1-mile loop - this easier trail takes you through an ancient forest where you can walk amongst 1,000+ year-old redwoods. Besides numerous redwood trees, you can also spot huckleberry bushes, various ferns, and even animals like rough-skinned newts and red-legged frogs.


Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park


| Hiouchi Trail // 2 miles - another great hike in the Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park is this slightly longer trail along the beautiful turquoise Smith River. The trail passes old-growth redwoods as well as plants such as Douglas-firs, tanoak, huckleberry and thimbleberry.


Location: Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park


| Endert's Beach (via the Coastal Trail) // 0.6 miles - this coastal trail rewards you with great views of the Pacific Ocean as well as the opportunity to check out some tide pools. Likewise, there are interpretive signs along the way that help you learn more about the coastal forests and the various tidepool creatures.


Location: Redwood National Park


| Yurok Loop Trail // 1-mile loop - another coastal trail is this short 1-mile loop hike that gives you the opportunity to look for various seabirds that often nest on the nearby seastacks (rock structures). Commonly spotted birds include cormorants, brown pelicans and common murres. Likewise, you can also see False Klamath Cove and Lagoon Creek from the trail.

Location: Redwood National Park


| Ossagon Trail // 1.8 miles - this trail, which is actually along an old road, takes visitors through dense second-growth forest and out to a more secluded stretch of beach. The trail is open to both hikers and bikers.


Location: Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park and Redwood National Park


| Friendship Ridge Trail // 3 miles - this trail, though a bit steeper than most (switchbacks are present), is a great spot to look for the park's resident Roosevelt elk. It also takes you from a dense redwood forest nearly all the way down to the coast. This trail can also be combined with other trails for a full-day adventure.


Location: Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park


| Clintonia Trail // 1 mile - the trail's name comes from the bright pink-ish colored flowers that bloom in the spring. The hike, though short, can be combined with others in the area for a full day of exploring.


Location: Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park




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LONGER HIKES


| Rellim Ridge Trail to Mill Creek Loop // 10.2 mile loop - this strenuous hike climbs up through dense forest to a private vista point that overlooks the Crescent City Harbor and beyond. The hike can be reached near the west end of Howland Hill Road.


Location: Del Norte Coast Redwood State Park


| Rhododendron Trail // 11.4 miles total - if visiting Redwood National and State Parks during the spring or early summer time, then this trail should be high on your list. During that time of year, the usually green forest becomes dotted with vibrant pink and red flowers. This is a popular trail with photographers, so consider coming early if you want to see the blooms by yourself.


Location: Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park


| James Irvine Trail // 10.4 miles total - this out and back trail starts near the Prairie Creek Visitor Center before heading west through some stunning old-growth forests. One of the best parts about this trail is that at the end you reach the stunning Fern Canyon. This is a great option if you can't get a permit for Fern Canyon or if you want to see the world famous spot, but also want to explore some magical redwood groves.


Location: Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park


| Lost Man Creek Trail // 10.7 miles one-way - this long trail, which is actually along an old logging road, is open to both hikers and mountain bikers. Along the route, look out for ancient redwoods, various plants (including wild ginger and thimbleberry), and local wildlife. The trail begins at Lost Man Creek Picnic Area off of Lost Man Creek Road.


Location: Redwood National Park




Bright pink flowers in Redwood National Park in California



THE COASTAL TRAIL

The California Coastal Trail (CCT) will eventually run all the way from Oregon in the north to Mexico in the south, covering 1,230 miles along its insanely diverse route. Presently, around 70% of the trail is complete. You can pick up sections of the long-distance trail throughout Redwood National and State Parks - including, but not limited to, Crescent Beach, Endert's Beach, across the street from the Wilson Creek picnic area and near the Gold Bluffs Beach entrance station.


Learn more about the entire CCT here, and even more about its route through the national park here.



🥾 SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL TIP

When hiking in Redwood National and State Parks (or anywhere really), always try to be a good steward and stay on the designated trails. Because the land is quite fragile near redwood groves, when people head off trail the landscape begins to become damaged: ferns get trampled, the groundcover wears away, and the tree's roots can become exposed.


It is believed that these human-caused disruptions can permanently damage the redwoods - mainly because foot traffic turns the uniquely spongy soil in old-growth groves (which is actually a thick mat of decomposing redwood needles) into hard dirt that inhibits root growth and absorbs less water. While you might believe that one person going off trail wouldn't cause that much damage, these minor changes caused by bushwhacking do in fact affect the redwoods.


Therefore, always stay on designated trails, don't create social trails, don't climb around on redwood trees, and of course, ALWAYS follow Leave No Trace Principles.






EXPLORE OUR INTERACTIVE REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK MAP






 


Redwood National and State Parks is one of the prettiest places to explore in all of California. With its wide array of biomes, stunning scenery and rich history, there is seriously so much to explore in this amazing national park. Hopefully, these half day, full day, 2 day and 3 day travel itineraries give you a great idea on how to spend your time in the park. But as always, if you have any questions, please leave a comment below or reach out to us directly.


And don't forget to check out our full Redwood National Park Adventure Guide, which has even more helpful adventure travel information and inspiration.




 

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